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Saturday, January 1, 2011

Fast Day 187 New Year's Day 2011 January 1 2011 {Pater Noster New Year}



 Pater Noster New Year's!

It's New Year's eve midnighting
and I think the world's gonna end;
I dont have my baby and dont have my friend;
the cognac-and-coke limousine's waiting
to take me back home again.
We drink to forget
the body's bitter anisette:
let us, Father, forgo our debts
as you forgive our neglects!

Absinthe of our axilla
makes us feel that we cannot die;
we don't ask for reasons, don't ask for why;
transvestites dance in their Grey Goose favela
weeping clicquot as they cry!
We drink to forget
the body's bitter anisette:
let us, Father, forgo our debts
as you forgive our neglects!

Three o'clock now is popping,
and there's nothin' we cannot do!
funky medina murra, jägermeister zoo!
cognac-and-coke hearse aint stopping;
we look for more people to screw!
We drink to forget
the body's bitter anisette:
let us, Father, forgo our debts
as you forgive our neglects!



 ----
notes:

Pater Noster ::  literally, Our Father; the prayer title in Latin.
anisette ::  a liqueuer with spicy anise. Anise is the only thing that makes liquorice tolerable.
absinthe ::   super booze with wormwood, emblem of animal craving(musk) and death(wormwood)

axilla ::  armpits
Grey Goose ::   vodka brand that costs a lot due to marketing, not necessarily quality.

favela ::   Brazilian slum
clicquot ::   Veuve Clicquot - the Widow Clicquot - is a good champagne. Here they weep tears of champagne.


jägermeister ::  a bitter liqueur which I have never tasted.
medina murra ::  literally,  a bitter city.   It is ambiguous, referring to urban areas or Tone Loc's funky medina drink. It also hints at myrrh, one of the Three King's gifts, as myrrh was known for bitterness - in nature and in use: it was used in embalming - and its root is also " m-r-r ".
(It could also be used as a reference to a cemetery, such as the City of the Dead in Cairo, where a large populace lives, inhabiting aged mausolea.)

cognac-and-coke  ::   favorite drink of young urban boys that commit suicide.

forgo our debts :: the original Greek can be read "debts" or trespasses. I always got the idea that the trespass involved was one that involved a fine to be paid, hence, a debt to pay. The use of the word "debt" led to misunderstandings among the debtor classes and, therefore, was abolished  by an obliging church hierarchy.

2 comments:

greeneyes616 said...

Poetry is my first love though I have written book and am on my second to me there is nothng like the emotion found in a poem and I love yours...so happy I found your Blog....Patricia

Montag said...

Thank you, Patricia. This one was a real struggle: it went from absolutely no idea what to write to something a bit overwhelming and very loud in my head like rock.

Words and images are such a joy.

Thank you, again.